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Thursday, 24 May 2012

News Clipping: Bridport's May Fair under threat

Bridport May Fair 2nd May 2005
The future of Bridport’s May Fair may be in doubt unless more people step forward to inject a new lease of life into the event. This year’s fair, held on the Millennium Green at Mountfield, saw former West Dorset MP Sir James Spicer crown the Queen of the May, traditional maypole dancing and special Jubilee competitions.

READ MORE - Source: Bridport and Lyme Regis News



Above: May Pole Dancing at Bridport Mountfield Millennium Green 2005 performed by Bernard Gale's Bridport School of Dancing.

Dorset Folklorist, John Symonds Udal wrote in his book 'Dorsetshire Folklore' published in 1922 about Bridport's traditional May Day customs:
Flower Service: Bridport. — The town of Bridport in West Dorset has for many years been prominent in keeping up an old flower custom on May Sunday—the first Sunday in May. The Bridport News in May, 1885, gave an interesting account of the ceremony, where on “May Sunday " the children, to the number of 312, assembled at the schools in Gundry Lane, and having been duly marshalled in procession, marched to the parish church, carrying flowers. They came up South Street as far as the old castle, and going down the east side of the street crossed again by the rectory, and entered the church by the west door, occupying seats in the nave, which were given up to them for the occasion by the parishioners who generally used them. The children were accompanied by their superintendent and also by their teachers. Divine service followed, and in the afternoon the usual children's service was held. The bells were rung spiritedly at intervals during the day and a flag was hoisted, as usual, on the church tower. 
Again, in May, 1890, the Bridport News recorded that, in accordance with the usual custom, the first Sunday in May was kept by the scholars of the Bridport Parish Church Sunday Schools by the usual special and joyous services. Shortly after 7 a.m. the bells of the parish church (St. Mary's) pealed forth to herald in the school anniversary, and at 8 o'clock there was a full choral celebration of the Holy Communion. In his sermon the Rector, the Rev. E. J. B. Henslowe, alluded to the origin of May Sunday celebrations in Bridport, and to the fact that it was an institution not celebrated to his knowledge in any other town, but was peculiar to Bridport. He said that years ago there was no proper school, but classes were held by different people in their own houses'; these classes used to meet once a year, and have a procession and go to church. 
In the afternoon the usual flower service was held.  The scholars formed in procession and again marched to the church. The rector officiated.  The service commenced with a hymn, and then the scholars passed up to the chancel steps and presented their floral offerings.   While another hymn was being sung flowers were presented by members of the congregation. The service was then proceeded with.   The flowers were afterwards packed and forwarded to London for some of the hospitals. Again, in May, 1905, the Bridport News contributed a long leading article on the subject which it styled " May Sunday : A Link with the Past".    It dealt fully with the origin of the present flower-custom in Bridport, and referred to the institution of Sunday Schools in Bridport in connexion with St. Mary's Church in 1788.   At that time the procession formed almost a complete “perambulation” of the parish boundaries, and many visitors would come in from the country “to see the children walk”.   The writer of the article thinks that this " walking " may have been but a survival of a much older custom — that of “beating the bounds " — which prevailed in many parishes at Rogation-tide ;   and that “May Sunday” occurring near the same time of the year the one custom had at the end of the eighteenth century merged into the other.    As we have seen, the custom of “walking” still continues, but only to a very limited extent."






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